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In Riverdale, the world revolves around “The Man In Black” In Riverdale, the world revolves around “The Man In Black”

Last season, Riverdale had an episode that still stands out for how different it was from the rest of the season and series, “Chapter Twenty: Tales From The Darkside.” While it’s an episode that ultimately exists with the knowledge after the fact that the series couldn’t quite live up to the plot points, standards,…

In Riverdale, a manhunt has nothing on gargoyles, gangs, and... gargoyle gangs In Riverdale, a manhunt has nothing on gargoyles, gangs, and... gargoyle gangs

“Chapter Forty-One: Manhunter” is one of those Riverdale episodes where, if you were to explain a large portion of it to anyone who knows absolutely nothing about Riverdale, you would sound very out of touch with reality. That’s technically true of every episode, especially after the first season, but imagine having…

It's time to question Supergirl's concept of good and bad It's time to question Supergirl's concept of good and bad

Supergirl wears its political and ideological leanings on its sleeve. That’s just part of the package when you watch the series, and to expect something else—especially four seasons in—is to simply expect a different show. Subtlety isn’t its particular brand of creative currency, but that only really becomes a problem…

Riverdale’s blast to the past reminds us only real ‘90s kids worship the Gargoyle King Riverdale’s blast to the past reminds us only real ‘90s kids worship the Gargoyle King

In a way, every single episode of Riverdale is a gimmick episode. So when the show goes out of its way to create a very clear “gimmick episode” (for example, the Carrie: The Musical episode), it feels even more like an out-of-body experience than your standard, already pretty “out there” episode of Riverdale. But now…

Everyone in Riverdale is just trying their best, as troubling as that is Everyone in Riverdale is just trying their best, as troubling as that is

Because of Riverdale’s second season, it’s hard to watch these early season three episodes without waiting for the other shoe to drop. As promising as these stories are right now, there’s still the sense that whatever the answers behind mysteries like the Gargoyle King and the seizures and The Farm are, they won’t…

Riverdale meets the Gargoyle King, the stuff of nightmares & secret pacts Riverdale meets the Gargoyle King, the stuff of nightmares & secret pacts

After last week’s relatively strong premiere, Riverdale keeps the momentum going with “Chapter Thirty-Seven: Fortune and Men’s Eyes.” And this episode truly is non-stop tonal shifts, as the culmination of Archie’s terrible, no good, very bad summer is a walk in the park compared to the Dark Dungeons-esque mystery…

Riverdale returns for the official end of summer, innocence, and dark Archie Riverdale returns for the official end of summer, innocence, and dark Archie

Even at its lowest points, there’s always something to appreciate about Riverdale. Even after a sophomore slump, there’s still a reason to long for the show during hiatus. And an episode like “Chapter Thirty-Six: Labor Day” explains why that is: It’s because Riverdale is the type of show where things like a murder…

With “Every Potato Has A Receipt,” it’s the end of the GLOW as we know it With “Every Potato Has A Receipt,” it’s the end of the GLOW as we know it

“Every Potato Has A Receipt” is like a rush of adrenaline, and that appears to be GLOW’s standard when it comes to its season finales and the big shows G.L.O.W. puts on. Honestly, the finales are also the points in the show that really strain believability in terms of the proper wrestling of this time period…

With “Rosalie,” GLOW reluctantly prepares to say goodbye With “Rosalie,” GLOW reluctantly prepares to say goodbye

Even with the future of G.L.O.W. hanging in the balance, “Rosalie” is somewhat of a cool down episode after the terrific—but often stressful—run of recent episodes this season. And just like in wrestling, sometimes a cool down is just what you need before the main event. So taking the back-to-school idea of GLOW …

With "The Good Twin," GLOW chooses to wrestle (and sing) like nobody's watching With "The Good Twin," GLOW chooses to wrestle (and sing) like nobody's watching

Much like “Nothing Shattered” was a necessary GLOW episode for Ruth’s character and the entire G.L.O.W. family, “The Good Twin” is also a necessary episode—just for the simple fact that it lets us finally know what a full episode of this world’s G.L.O.W. looks like. And god, it looks every bit as amazing as one could…

In “Nothing Shattered,” GLOW deals with the real repercussions of “that fake stuff on TV” In “Nothing Shattered,” GLOW deals with the real repercussions of “that fake stuff on TV”

Picking up where “Work The Leg” left off, “Nothing Shattered” quickly captures that feeling of not knowing what to do—as a worker, as part of the crew, as an audience member—when an actual injury happens. There’s the question of it’s real at first, and while professional wrestling has its own lingo for that; referees…

GLOW’s sexy star snaps, when all she had to do was “Work The Leg” GLOW’s sexy star snaps, when all she had to do was “Work The Leg”

At first, “Work The Leg” looks like it might go the way of season one’s “Live Studio Audience,” with Ruth and Debbie’s lack of communication and eventual montage at least leading to a good performance until someone like Mark ruins it again. However, this season has worked hard to show that Debbie can be her own worst…

1985 called, and GLOW would like us to know “Perverts Are People, Too” 1985 called, and GLOW would like us to know “Perverts Are People, Too”

We’ve finally hit the true proof of G.L.O.W.’s popularity in the halfway mark of GLOW. Fans wait outside the venue with signs (“CAN I BE YOUR WELFARE KING?”), they cosplay, they send fan mail ranging from a genuine appreciation for the characters to dick pics (the ‘80s really weren’t so different). There is a fandom…

As promised, GLOW's “Mother Of All Matches” delivers As promised, GLOW's “Mother Of All Matches” delivers

After the first three episodes of set-up—or “build,” since it’s wrestling—GLOW gives us the “Mother Of All Matches.” As I mentioned in “Candy Of The Year,” Tammé and Debbie are two characters who have some things in common, even if they’re still from different worlds. This episode highlights that completely, even…

The “Concerned Women Of America” and GLOW really have some stuff to work out The “Concerned Women Of America” and GLOW really have some stuff to work out

While the viewing audience is conditioned to see the women of GLOW as underdogs, the show’s already making clear that their hard work is not going unnoticed. Sure, the previous episode had a problem with live audience investment, but a major point was that they had a live audience at all; people were even coming to…

GLOW proves that a seat at the table isn’t all that glamorous GLOW proves that a seat at the table isn’t all that glamorous

While “Viking Funeral” was prep day, “Candy Of The Year” kicks things off with an in-progress match and a full house for G.L.O.W. While GLOW knows how to move from episode-to-episode with ease, the kinks still need to be worked out for G.L.O.W., like the crowd not caring about the in-ring action—partially the fault of…

GLOW returns, more or less ready to make history GLOW returns, more or less ready to make history

GLOW gets into the bigger scope for season two fairly early on: It’s officially back to work for G.L.O.W., only the stakes are higher than just making one hopefully successful episode of television. “Viking Funeral” begins a 10-episode season which covers the show-within-the-show’s 20 weeks of tapings... and things…

A temporary resurrection for Lucifer makes another strong case for more stories A temporary resurrection for Lucifer makes another strong case for more stories

“Boo Normal” is a strange episode of Lucifer. It exists both within and outside the series’ universe, though in a different way from the episode that follows it. It also exists as an episode where Lucifer is truly a supporting character. In fact, this is an episode about Ella, through Ella’s eyes. It even begins with…

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